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The Daguerreotype: landscape and architecture


Engraving of the first photograph of the Pathenon.
Taken by Gaspard-Pierre-Gustave Joly de Lotbinière in 1839.
Published in Excursions daguériennes by Noël Paymal Lerebours in 1841
 




 
Niagara. Chute Du Fer a Cheval
  from Excursions daguerriennes:
vues et monuments les plus remarquables du globe, 

published by Lerebours, Nöel-Marie-Paymal 

1840
engraving from daguerreotype
26.0 x 73.5 cm. 


source: Daguerreotypomania GEH

"The Excursions Daguerriennes, représentant les vues et les monuments les plus remarquables du globe, [Daguerreian Travels, representing the most remarkable views and monuments in the world] was published in Paris by Noël-Marie Paymal Lerebours between 1841 and 1864. The volumes were sold by subscription and in the end contained more than one hundred views of Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East shot between 1839 and 1844. Pattinson's view of the falls was the only view of North America to appear in the publication.

The only way in which a daguerreotype could be printed was by making an engraving from the plate. The daguerreotype process produced a laterally reversed image, there being no negative. The engraving is traced from the daguerreotype and then turned over to give the "correct" orientation of the subject. Extra details were often added to engravings to add more "interest."


 

 
Babbitt, Platt D.
American (-1879)

  Niagara Falls
ca. 1855
daguerreotype
13.2 x 18.3 cm., full plate 
 


Southworth & Hawes
American (active ca 1845-1861)
The Niagara Suspension Bridge
March 8, 1855
daguerreotype
21.5 X 16.5 cm., full plate
source: http://www.geh.org/taschen/htmlsrc15/m197401930180_ful.html




Southworth & Hawes
American (active ca 1845-1861)
Niagara Falls
ca. 1850
daguerreotype

21.5 X 16.5 cm., full plate


source: http://www.geh.org/fm/mismis/htmlsrc26/m197401930262A_ful.html#topofimage




Southworth & Hawes   
American (active ca 1845-1861)
Niagara River above the falls
ca. 1850
daguerreotype


source: Daguerreotypomania GEH  







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