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Edward S. Curtis (1868 – 1952)

E. S. Curtis (1904): Canon de Chelly – Navajo.
Seven riders on horseback and dog trek against background of canyon cliffs.




A smoky day at the Sugar Bowl--Hupa, c. 1923.
Hupa man with spear, standing on rock midstream



 
Hopi mother, 1922.





  Crow's Heart, Mandan




The Pool- Apache




Self-Portrait of Edward S. Curtis 1868-1952.



 


In 1906 J.P. Morgan offered Curtis $3,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. It was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. Morgan was to receive 25 sets and 500 original prints as his method of repayment. 222 complete sets were eventually published. Curtis' goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before that way of life disappeared. He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: "The information that is to be gathered ... respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost." Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only recorded history.

source: Wikipedia

 







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