21 November 2010

Walker Evans (1903-1975)

"Leaving aside the mysteries and the inequities of human talent, brains, taste, and reputations, the matter of art in photography may come down to this: it is the capture and projection of the delights of seeing; it is the defining of observation full and felt."

Walker Evans

Walker Evans began to photograph in the late 1920s, making snapshots during a European trip. Upon his return to New York, he published his first images in 1930. During the Great Depression, Evans began to photograph for the Resettlement Administration, later known as the Farm Security Administration (FSA), documenting workers and architecture in the Southeastern states. In 1936 he traveled with the writer James Agee to illustrate an article on tenant farm families for Fortune magazine; the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men came out of this collaboration.

Throughout his career Evans contributed photographs to numerous publications, including three devoted solely to his work. In 1965 he left Fortune, where he had been a staff photographer for twenty years, to become a professor of photography and graphic design at Yale University. He remained in the position until 1974, a year before his death.

source: Getty Museum
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artMakerDetails?maker=1634&page=2



 Walker Evans
New York City, 1929
Gelatin silver print
7 1/4 x 5 in.



 Walker Evans
 Brooklyn Bridge, 1928-29
Gelatin silver print


 


 Walker Evans
Girl in Fulton Street
New York, 1929




Walker Evans
New York City, 1929
Gelatin silver print



Walker Evans
6th Avenue and 42nd Street, 1929
Gelatin silver print




Walker Evans
Subway portrait
1938 - 1941
Gelatin silver print
6 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. 




Walker Evans
Five Men Playing Basketball: For the Series "Dress"
New York City, April 9, 1963
Gelatin silver print
8 5/16 x 11 3/4 in.





 Walker Evans
Graffiti: Dead End
about 1973-74
Polaroid SX-70 print

3 1/8 x 3 1/16 in


  
  
Walker Evans
 Saint Martin, West Indies, 1974
Dye diffusion print
4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in.


© Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Paul Strand (1890 – 1976)

"Paul Strand's debut in photography coincided with the first stirrings of modernism in the visual arts in America. Born in New York in 1890, he attended both the class and club in photography taught by Hine at the Ethical Culture School in 1908. A visit to Stieglitz's 291 gallery arranged by Hine inspired Strand to explore the expressive possibilities of the medium, which until then he had considered a hobby. 

Although he was active for a brief period at the Camera Club of New York, whose darkrooms he continued to use for about 20 years, his ideas derived first from the circle around Stieglitz and then from the group that evolved around the Modern Gallery in 1915, including Sheeler and Schamberg. Strand's work, which was exhibited at 291, the Modem Gallery, and the Camera Club, gained prizes at the Wanamaker Photography exhibitions and was featured in the last two issues of Camera Work. 

From about 1915 on, he explored the visual problems that were to become fundamental to the modernist aesthetic as it evolved in both Europe and the United States. During the 1920s he mainly photographed urban sites, continued with the machine forms begun earlier, and turned his attention to nature, using 5 x 7 and 8 x 10 inch view cameras and making contact prints on platinum paper. In these works, acknowledged as seminal in the evolution of the New Objectivity, form and feeling are indivisible and intense. In addition, Strand's writings, beginning in 1917 with "Photography and the New God," set forth the necessity for the photographer to evolve an aesthetic based on the objective nature of reality and on the intrinsic capabilities of the large-format camera with sharp lens."


source:  A World History of Photography by Naomi Rosenblum




Paul Strand. 
Porch Shadows, 1916. 
Alfred Stieglitz Collection. 
©Aperture Foundation Inc., 
Paul Strand Archive.






 Paul Strand (1890 – 1976)
Blind woman, New York, 1917





Paul Strand 
Double Akeley, New York 1922