Skip to main content

Walker Evans (1903-1975)

"Leaving aside the mysteries and the inequities of human talent, brains, taste, and reputations, the matter of art in photography may come down to this: it is the capture and projection of the delights of seeing; it is the defining of observation full and felt."

Walker Evans

Walker Evans began to photograph in the late 1920s, making snapshots during a European trip. Upon his return to New York, he published his first images in 1930. During the Great Depression, Evans began to photograph for the Resettlement Administration, later known as the Farm Security Administration (FSA), documenting workers and architecture in the Southeastern states. In 1936 he traveled with the writer James Agee to illustrate an article on tenant farm families for Fortune magazine; the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men came out of this collaboration.

Throughout his career Evans contributed photographs to numerous publications, including three devoted solely to his work. In 1965 he left Fortune, where he had been a staff photographer for twenty years, to become a professor of photography and graphic design at Yale University. He remained in the position until 1974, a year before his death.

source: Getty Museum
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artMakerDetails?maker=1634&page=2



 Walker Evans
New York City, 1929
Gelatin silver print
7 1/4 x 5 in.



 Walker Evans
 Brooklyn Bridge, 1928-29
Gelatin silver print


 


 Walker Evans
Girl in Fulton Street
New York, 1929




Walker Evans
New York City, 1929
Gelatin silver print



Walker Evans
6th Avenue and 42nd Street, 1929
Gelatin silver print




Walker Evans
Subway portrait
1938 - 1941
Gelatin silver print
6 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. 




Walker Evans
Five Men Playing Basketball: For the Series "Dress"
New York City, April 9, 1963
Gelatin silver print
8 5/16 x 11 3/4 in.





 Walker Evans
Graffiti: Dead End
about 1973-74
Polaroid SX-70 print

3 1/8 x 3 1/16 in


  
  
Walker Evans
 Saint Martin, West Indies, 1974
Dye diffusion print
4 1/4 x 3 1/2 in.


© Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Comments

Carl Hahn said…
Very intresting article and also the photographs. Could spend hours looking at all the links.

Popular posts from this blog

Group f/64 Manifesto (1932)

Ansel Adams by Dorothea Lange



Group f/64 Manifesto
The name of this Group is derived from a diaphragm number of the photographic lens. It signifies to a large extent the qualities of clearness and definition of the photographic image which is an important element in the work of members of this Group.
The chief object of the Group is to present in frequent shows what it considers the best contemporary photography of the West; in addition to the showing of the work of its members, it will include prints from other photographers who evidence tendencies in their work similar to that of the Group.
Group f/64 is not pretending to cover the entire of photography or to indicate through its selection of members any deprecating opinion of the photographers who are not included in its shows. There are great number of serious workers in photography whose style and technique does not relate to the metier of the Group.
Group f/64 limits its members and invitational names to those workers who are strivin…

Paul Strand: method and vision

Portrait, Washington Square Park, 1917



Pears and Bowls, 1916



Wild Iris, Maine, 1927


Wall Street, 1915



Portrait of Georges Braque, 1957

The “full acceptance” of reality is the method and goal of the photographer, observed Paul Strand. However, full objectivity has to be something different from a passive receptivity but must emerge from an active and vigilant attitude that requires the photographer’s control of his subject. Or rather, it requires the coming together of subject and object in the intervening space of the photograph, synthesizing and perhaps transcending both, a mediating space, both familiar and unusual, made of masses and voids, light and shadows, made of the equivalence of presence and absence,  of correspondences of vision and forms in the world, of the coalescence of equivalent forms in a frame, of a spatialized time and a space of  gradually superposed temporalities.

Marcelo Guimarães Lima

links:
http://lumieregallery.net/wp/197/paul-strand/
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettygu…

Robert Demachy (1859–1936)

Robert Demachy "In Brittany", 1904 From: Camera Work, No 5 1904




Robert Demachy "Toucques Valley", 1906 from: Camera Work. No 16 1906






Robert Demachy Dancer, c. 1909




Robert Demachy Academie,  1900




Robert Demachy Struggle, 1904